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Young man at his graduation.
Uplifting News

Landlord Leaves Student Homeless - Now, He Graduated at the Top of His Class

No one could say it's been easy for 19-year-old Elijah Hogan. Struggling with homelessness, he didn't even think he'd make it through high school. And yet, despite his dire circumstances, he's accomplished what most of us wouldn't, even in ideal conditions: Elijah didn't just manage to graduate, he graduated top of his class.

Mom Refuses to Terminate Her Pregnancy After Doctors Suggest It - Now Her Toddler Is Proving Everyone Wrong
Uplifting News

Mom Refuses to Terminate Her Pregnancy After Doctors Suggest It - Now Her Toddler Is Proving Everyone Wrong

Expecting the birth of a child is often the highlight of any parent's life. Michael and Michelle Bower were no exception; they were overjoyed when they learned they were having a daughter. The Indiana couple's excitement took a turn, however, when they found out about some major complications at the 20-week mark. An ultrasound informed them that their daughter had a condition called spina bifida, a type of neural tube defect that can cause paralysis, changes to the brain, and severe trauma injuries to the nerves.How a Little Girl Proved Doctors WrongThe parents-to-be were devastated when doctors informed them their child would likely be unable to walk, talk, or breathe on their own. They even suggested Michelle terminate the pregnancy -- the odds of a healthy life for a child with this condition so unlikely. However, Michelle and Michael were determined to see it through. They decided to go through with one of the riskiest types of surgery, one that would attempt to close the opening in their baby's spine -- while still in utero. So Michelle underwent surgery on April 27, 2020, with over 35 medical professionals present for the delicate, 3-hour long, operation. Michelle was then confined to a strict bed rest for the rest of her pregnancy.Ultimately, the couple's daughter -- Lacey -- was delivered via a cesarean section on July 20. Lacey was immediately taken to intensive care, where she spent the next 18 days learning to feed and beginning to wiggle her toes and ankles. Doctors determined she was partially paralyzed from the waist down, but Lacey soon began to surprise everyone, and hasn't stopped since. At just 19-months-old, Lacey was able to speak at the level of an average 3-year-old. Soon after, she even began to maneuver her body more than doctors ever expected. The Miracle One Couple WitnessedNow at 3 years old, she has even taken her first steps with the help of a walker. In the above video shared to Michael's Facebook page, Lacey can be seen walking up the family's driveway with her walker. The parents regularly share updates regarding Lacey's development to the Facebook page, which has now become a beacon of hope for others with similarly challenging medical conditions. "Every day you get to witness a miracle," Michael proudly told a publication. “It really is incredible because one year ago, she was standing for the first time,” he marveled. “You know, doing something we never thought we’d see Lacey do. And now it’s been a year, and she can walk in her walker, and I mean completely supporting all of her own weight, which is just incredible, and I truly believe we’re going to get to a point where she doesn’t even need a walker. She has that drive.”How One Little Girl Proved the Importance of PerseveranceThis drive is the most impressive part of Lacey's journey, and precisely what makes her such an inspiration. Despite the bleak outlook of her diagnosis, Lacey is a ray of joy. She is rarely seen without a smile on her face, and is constantly laughing. She remains clever, inquisitive, and determined -- traits her parents believe have helped her defy the odds. Lacey is the embodiment of perseverance. She possesses an unstoppable spirit, and is a shining example of the power of determination. Her progress exhibited on Facebook is now an inspiration to hundreds of thousands who follow the updates. Most recently, her father shared an update that Lacey would begin preschool.By all accounts, Lacey is beating the odds of her diagnosis, and leading a full life. Her story is an inspiration for any facing hurdles in their life, beyond medical challenges. The strength of her spirit is remarkable, and can teach us all to keep going, especially when it seems most difficult. More from Goalcast:Doctors Wanted to Put Baby with Down Syndrome in an Institution – 15 Years Later, She Proves Them WrongGirl Who ‘Can’t Smile’ Is Constantly Bullied by Classmates – Years Later, Proves Everyone Wrong and Becomes a SupermodelBlack Woman’s Family Thinks She’s “Crazy” to Quit Her Full Time Job – Proves Everyone Wrong by Achieving Her Dream

What Shrek and Leonard Cohen’s 'Hallelujah' Teach Us About Rejection and Perseverance
Movies

What Shrek and Leonard Cohen’s 'Hallelujah' Teach Us About Rejection and Perseverance

The best songs take us to amazing, unexpected places. They teach us things about ourselves, about others. They get into our heads and roll off our tongues. They share memories, wishes, struggles, and feelings. Often, songs can relay thoughts with greater emotion and power than words simply spoken or on the page. They reach our hearts, our souls, and our dreams. The Leonard Cohen classic 'Hallelujah' is such a song. Crazily enough, that heartfelt, transcendent song had to travel a long, steep, winding, obstacle-filled road to reach the public and become the phenomenal hit it is today. In fact, it only became the iconic ballad modern audiences know—and a key song in the soundtrack of the movie Shrek—decades after it was originally conceived and recorded.Learn how, against all odds and many roadblocks, Cohen’s (and others’) dedication and belief in the magic of this song, kept it alive and kicking for years until it became the 'Hallelujah' we know, love, and listen to today. The Winding Road of Creation(Getty)You might think that any fantastic song would naturally be appreciated from the get-go, but that’s just not always the case. There is no better example of this truth than the story of Leonard Cohen's 'Hallelujah.' Today, 'Hallelujah' is revered, and is one of the most covered songs of all time.Before a song can seep into the public consciousness and impact us, it has to get imagined, written, produced, played, and released out into the world. In other words, it needs to get heard—and enjoyed—by a lot of people.The creative process is a tricky thing. Sometimes, when musicians create a song, it flows easily, words quickly scribbled on paper (or typed) soon becoming fully formed lyrics begging to be sung. Other times, the refrains might not come so naturally. There may be a long struggle to turn the words into the final piece that the musicians are happy with. Often, the songwriting dance may fall somewhere in between, with the songwriter mixing moments of inspiration with the hard work of playing around with the words until, finally, they sound—and feel—just right.Whether or not the initial concept for a song comes quickly, typically, lots of trial and error and tweaking of a phrase here or there go into finding the lyrics that work best. Playing a song live can also help to inform this creative tinkering. Once the song is “done,” there’s still more work to complete.Next, comes the process of getting their creation out into the world. This, too, can be a simple process, say by playing the song at a show or putting it up on the Internet for all to hear. It’s not always that easy, though. Much determination—and luck—is often required for a song to break through and reach critics, music industry executives, and fans. In fact, many amazing songs may never reach the ears that might love to hear (and sing along with) them. And, even for songs that do get produced and listened to, it can still take lots of time and effort—even if it’s a really great song—to get the recognition they deserve. The Unbelievable Rejection (And Redemption) Of Leonard Cohen’s 'Hallelujah'(Getty)Leonard Cohen was already an established, successful musician with many hits to his name when he started writing what became 'Hallelujah.' Regardless, the Canadian folk legend had trouble even getting his album that had the song 'Hallelujah' on it released. But way before that he had an even tougher time writing the song itself.In fact, Cohen worked on the song for over 5 years, ultimately creating over 60 versions of the powerful song. The songwriter, who was also a poet and novelist, created music for over 40 years. The idea of 'Hallelujah' came to him in the late 1970s but when he first started working on it, the words just didn’t feel right. But, luckily, Cohen believed in the concept of the song, so he just kept tinkering with it, moving lyrics in and out, taking a break from it now and again. Then, returning to it, over and over.Finally, after years of editing and rewriting, Cohen was happy with the song. He put it in his 1984 album Various Positions. However, when he brought it to his label, CBS, the head of the record company, American music industry icon Walter Yetnikoff, passed on the album. Yetnikoff rejected it, not because he didn’t like the music, but because he didn’t think it would sell. He suggested that Cohen abandon 'Hallelujah' (and the rest of the music on the album) and make something more commercial instead. However, Cohen was undeterred and set about making sure the music was released. He was convinced that 'Hallelujah' was a great song and that all his efforts on this album had created music worth getting out into the world. So, instead of giving up on this endeavor, Cohen decided to try his luck elsewhere and took the album to another label. Ultimately, Various Positions landed at a small, independent label called Passport Records. The record was released to the public in 1984 and he performed 'Hallelujah' and other songs from the album to crowds on his 1985 tour. However, the song failed to become a colossal hit—at least right away. In fact, his original recording of the song did not thrill listeners or critics. Still, Cohen was steadfast in his belief in the song, and kept on working on it. He tried out various big and small changes to the song, including tweaking various verses, whittling them down, adding new and old lines, rewriting whole sections, lengthening the song, slowing it down, speeding it up, and making it darker. Jeff Buckley, Shrek, and the Unexpected Rise of 'Hallelujah'(Getty)Cohen also kept playing the song at some of his shows. And as luck would have it, Welsh rock star John Cale of the Velvet Underground, attended Cohen's concert in 1990 and heard the Canadian singer perform 'Hallelujah.' Cale fell in love with the song that night and was so taken by it that he talked to Cohen about recording his own take on the ballad. Cohen agreed and sent him the lyrics. But not only that, Cohen shared 15 pages of various versions of the song for Cale to pick through. And that he did!Cale used this wealth of material to create his 1991 cover of 'Hallelujah,' a reimagining of the song as a melancholy piano ballad. He later said that he focused on “the cheeky parts,” folding sections of old and new variations of the song into his version. Cale retained many of the biblical references, some of which Cohen had dropped from his newer incarnations of the song. Cale’s version got some traction, but not much. It took ten years more years for Cale’s 'Hallelujah' to be featured in 2001’s Shrek. Before that, it ended up on a relatively obscure 1991 French compilation album called I’m Your Fan: the Songs of Leonard Cohen, which included covers of Cohen’s songs done by multiple artists. At the time, that album didn’t get much mainstream attention. However, up-and-coming musician Jeff Buckley ended up listening to it and was quite enthralled by Cale’s cover of 'Hallelujah.' So much so that Buckley decided to do his own version and started playing the song during his performances. Soon enough, an executive from Columbia Records heard Buckley play 'Hallelujah' and was impressed enough to give him a record deal. They then set about producing Buckley’s 1994 debut Grace, which featured Buckley’s cover of 'Hallelujah.'Again, at the time it was released, the record and song didn’t get a ton of mass appreciation. Sadly, it wasn’t until 3 years later in 1997, after Buckley drowned while swimming in a river, that his cover of 'Hallelujah' began to get noticed. Buckley’s death prompted much more attention toward his music. Soon, critics and audiences were listening to his version of the song in droves. And Buckley’s talent and the genius of 'Hallelujah' were finally recognized for the poignant beauty they embodied. In 2001, 'Hallelujah' was featured in the movie "Shrek," and totally blew up. Critics and fans alike went back to Cale and Cohen’s versions with new, more appreciative ears. Many other musicians started doing their own covers of the song, including Willie Nelson, Brandie Carlile, Rufus Wainwright, k.d. Lang, and Avril Lavigne. In addition to Shrek, 'Hallelujah' has been included in many prominent media projects such as The Watchman, The West Wing, The House, ER, and The OC. And streaming platforms have dozens of versions of the song sung by famous and obscure musicians for your listening pleasure.What 'Hallelujah' Teaches Us About Rejection and Persistence Ultimately, it took nearly 20 years for 'Hallelujah' to reach a wide audience, and several more for it to become famous, due to its inclusion in the movie Shrek. The slow but persistent path of “Hallelujah” marched steadfastly from its early inception as whispers of verse in Cohen’s mind.Determination in the face of rejection kept the song going. The story of this soulful song shows us that with persistence, talent, and belief in your dream, success may be just around the corner. Getting what you want may not always be easy, but just because it doesn’t happen right away, doesn’t mean it won’t happen in the future. It took years and years for the genius of 'Hallelujah' to be recognized for what it was. It took the right people hearing and singing the song for it to get the momentum it needed. It also took luck, coincidence, and hard work. Likewise, putting in the necessary effort and weathering and overcoming any obstacles in your way is key to achieving any dream you have. You might feel miles away from reaching your goal or even that it’s impossible. But if you believe in the idea or the project, trusting it’s worth the effort can help you put in the time and attention that’s needed for the concept to come to fruition. (Getty)The movie Shrek is what finally catapulted 'Hallelujah' to massive fame, but the power of Cohen, Cale, and Buckley’s great work are what enabled that to happen in the first place. This captivating song is a reminder that immediate success and rewards are not always the ideal barometer of quality or worthiness. And when you’ve got talent and grit on your side, sticking with your endeavors matters, and putting in the hard work that’s needed invariably pays off in the end.

8 Months Ago, He Was A 39-Year-Old DoorDash Driver - Today, He's A Pro Golfer
Uplifting News

8 Months Ago, He Was A 39-Year-Old DoorDash Driver - Today, He's A Pro Golfer

Contrary to popular belief, not all golfers are rich, and David Skinns was an example of a player who played for the love of the game for 16 years. But this summer, Skinns defied all expectations, proving hard work and perseverance can pay off no matter the odds.He worked as a bartender and food delivery driverEight months ago, 39-year-old English golfer David Skinns was working as a DoorDash delivery driver in Georgia to support his family through the coronavirus pandemic. He'd also spent time as a bartender during his 16-year career as a pro golfer. During that time, Skinns had only won one major victory and was ranked 82th on the points list just this July. But then came the Pinnacle Bank Championship in Omaha, Nebraska in August, and the Englishman defied all expectations — well, except his own.Defying expectationsAt the tournament, the last of the regular season, Skinns had one of the best golf days of his life, one-putting the last four holes to win against much-younger golfers.“It was stressful on me, and it was stressful on my family,” Skinns told Golf Digest of his improbable victory. “I always believed I could win this week."A accomplished his life-long dreamAlong with winning the tournament, Skinns leaped into the top echelon for points on the season, becoming one of just 25 players to earn an illustrious PGA Tour card.“It’s unreal. It’s been a lot of years to hear those words,” he told Golf Digest.Perseverance pays offWhen everyone doubted Skinns, probably even his own family, he didn't listen. He knew he had what it takes and in the end, he proved all the haters wrong. His story is a wonderful example of perseverance fit for a Hollywood movie and proves that hard work can pay off at any age.More uplifting stories:4 Years Ago, He Was Homeless–Today, He Bought His First HousePoor Man Who Missed Job Interview To Save A Life Had Employers Lining Up To Hire HimDomestic Abuse Survivor Marries The First Responder Who Saved Her LifeBrooklyn Landlord Cancels Rent For Hundreds Of Tenants, Setting An Unprecedented Example For Others

Wife Trust Instincts And Persists After Husband Goes Missing - 17 Nights Later, He's Alive
Uplifting News

Wife Trust Instincts And Persists After Husband Goes Missing - 17 Nights Later, He's Alive

For 17 nights, a fisherman's wife was worried sick for her husband who was missing in the forest. A massive rescue team searched for him night and day, until they finally found him, thankfully in good condition. Lost in the wildernessAfter avid fisherman Harry Burleigh didn't come home from a camping trip in the Toketee area of Oregon, his wife Stacy called the police.The Douglas County Sheriff's Office said the 69-year-old fisherman may have tried to walk to Twin Lakes in the Umpqua National Forest to fish before heading home.But he didn't make it back.A massive search operationSearch teams from 18 different emergency service departments and eight counties showed a tremendous amount of perseverance while out in the forest to look for Burleigh. Stacy posted updates on a Facebook group while search teams left packages of food on the trails in hopes he would find them to no avail.Then on May 16, 10 days after Burleigh went missing — searchers found a tackle box and makeshift shelter, but no missing fisherman."They left him a note and lighter and told him to make a fire and they would be back in to get him tomorrow," Stacey wrote on Facebook. "It took the team another six hours to get out. "All prayers and positive energy are needed for successfully finding Harry and the searchers getting themselves and Harry our safely TODAY!"Stacy BurleighFound at lastA week later and 18 days after the fisherman went missing, prayers were answered as rescuers found a makeshift shelter southwest of the original one, and called out for Burleigh. He responded, and was found in relatively good health. "After 17 nights in the wilderness, 69-year-old Harry Burleigh has been found alive and rescued by Search and Rescue crews who never gave up," police said in a news release. "He was found to be walking and complaining of minor pain, but was in stable condition. A Brim Aviation helicopter was utilized to hoist Burleigh from his location and transport him to a waiting Lifeflight helicopter." Burleigh was taken to hospital but returned home to his family that evening."This was the outcome we all have been looking for in this case," said Douglas County Sheriff's Sgt. Brad O'Dell in the release. "The Sheriff's Office wants to thank everyone who was involved in this mission."A region came together to save a lifeIn all, 40 rescuers searched for Burleigh — that's a tremendous effort from various communities — and it all paid off. They should all be extremely proud of themselves for persevering and saving a life.More uplifting stories:Neighbors Stay Up All Night To Protect Asian Family From Recurring Racist AttacksBoy, 7, Saves 20-Year-Old Sister From Drowning With An Instinctive Yet Critical MoveRealtor Turns Homeless Man’s Life Around After He Returns Lost $10,000 Check8-Year-Old Boy Rescues Sister From Moving Car Driven By Volatile Kidnapper

25 Perseverance Quotes for When You Feel Like Giving Up
Motivation

25 Perseverance Quotes for When You Feel Like Giving Up

Perseveranceis the ability to keep doing something in spite of all the obstacles you mayencounter on the way to achieving your goals.It’s a wordthat can be easily explained, but the ones that persevere know the hard work itimplies. The ones that don’t also know – that’s why they don’t even dare todream big.It’s hard tobe perseverant mostly because the idea of failing again scares us. Think aboutit: you set a goal, use all of your resources to achieve it, and end up losingeverything. It’s only natural to feel discouraged and want to give up no matterwhat others tell you. You blame yourself for aiming too high and from then on,you set safer goals to protect yourself from future disappointment.But all you have to change is your approach, not your ambitions. Successful people know this so they never stop looking for better ways that will help them eventually win.Teach yourchildren that failure is part of success. Allow them to experience failure in asafe environment and watch them discovering new strategies to try again. They’llthank you later.Here are 25 perseverance quotes for when you feel like giving up:Many of life's failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up. Thomas Edison (more Thomas Edison quotes)Going on one more round, when you don’t think you can, that’s what makes all the difference in your life.SYLVESTER STALLONEFailure is only the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently. HENRY FORD (more Henry Ford quotes)Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying 'I will try again tomorrow. MARY ANNE RADMACHER Success is no accident. It is hard work, perseverance, learning, studying, sacrifice and most of all, love of what you are doing or learning to do. PELE It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer. ALBERT EINSTEIN (more Albert Einstein quotes)Men fail much oftener from want of perseverance than from want of talent. WILLIAM COBBETT A failure is not always a mistake. It may simply be the best one can do under the circumstances. The real mistake is to stop trying. B.F. SKINNER Just remember, you can do anything you set your mind to, but it takes action, perseverance, and facing your fears. GILLIAN ANDERSON The most essential factor is persistence – the determination never to allow your energy or enthusiasm to be dampened by the discouragement that must inevitably come. JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY In the realm of ideas everything depends on enthusiasm… in the real world all rests on perseverance. JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (more Goethe quotes)We can do anything we want to do if we stick to it long enough. HELEN KELLER (more Helen Keller quotes)Adversity, and perseverance and all these things can shape you. They can give you a value and a self-esteem that is priceless. SCOTT HAMILTON If one dream should fall and break into a thousand pieces, never be afraid to pick one of those pieces up and begin again. FLAVIA WEEDN Perseverance is a great element of success. If you only knock long enough and loud enough at the gate, you are sure to wake up somebody. HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW When you get into a tight place and everything goes against you … never give up then, for that is just the place and time that the tide will turn. HARRIET BEECHER STOWE What this power is I cannot say; all I know is that it exists and it becomes available only when a man is in that state of mind in which he knows exactly what he wants and is fully determined not to quit until he finds it. ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL It always seems impossible until it's done. NELSON MANDELA Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing must be attained. MARIE CURIE (more Marie Curie quotes)It does not matter how slowly you go so long as you do not stop. CONFUCIUS Courage is not having the strength to go on; it is going on when you don't have the strength. THEODORE ROOSEVELT A winner is just a loser who tried one more time. GEORGE M. MOORE JR. If you wish to succeed in life, make perseverance your bosom friend, experience your wise counselor, caution your elder brother, and hope your guardian genius. JOSEPH ADDISON Courage and perseverance have a magical talisman, before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish into air. JOHN QUINCY ADAMS Develop success from failures. Discouragement and failure are two of the surest stepping stones to success. DALE CARNEGIE

How I'm Working Through My Beginnings as a Creative Professional
Success

How I'm Working Through My Beginnings as a Creative Professional

This isn’t a success story. It’s about success in progress. I work in the creative field. You know, the one that’s notorious for being full of artists and professionals who are struggling to make a living. That in itself is a myth. The creative field is actually thriving, and it’s now one of the world’s leading industries. It's always growing, even if it's constantly changing. Here in Canada, the Conference Board reported that that the arts and culture industry contributed about 7% of the country’s real GDP in 2007 ($84.6 billion) and employed 1.1 million people that year. The Globe and Mail, the main national newspaper, says that that’s “more than [the] mining, forestry and fisheries sectors, plus the Canadian Forces, combined.” So I’m not here to say that artists and other creative professional have it rough in the end. Just in the beginning. Surviving those early days, months and maybe years is what I’m doing now. How I'm Working Through My Beginnings as a Creative Professional Nobody is gonna call you and say 'this lottery ticket is yours.' - Jerry Saltz The key to understanding success in the creative domain is understanding that it is founded on risk-taking and entrepreneurship. There’s a large portion of the sector that is entirely dependent on inventing your own job, niche, or functioning, independently of typical employment structures. There is a portion that’s fairly standard too, but I doubt I’ll ever get a desk job because I can paint a portrait in the style of Rembrandt or Sargent. If that were my only skill, I doubt I’d even thrive doing that. Adaptability is key Since May of 2016 I have had to negotiate the sales of large quantities of art, initiated a residency in Ontario, painted over 100 works, sold work online myself, sold work through third parties, curated exhibitions, gave talks, taught and taken classes (after my degree), started three websites, and hired various assistants throughout it all. That’s only the part related to my work as an artist. This sounds very art-oriented, but it’s important to remember that the above work requires skills in marketing, communications, budgeting, design, and management. It’s also meant that I’ve had to teach myself or find resources as I go. I've had to learn about website marketing and digital image production (it was all analogue for me before), for example, while I continue to develop my capacity for reading and writing (which was what 70% of my fine arts degree was about). Some of it has worked out and some of it has not. I spent January and February madly applying for work, all because one sale in one exhibition went awry for reasons beyond my control. I was broke and still am because of it. I paid my rent late, and am still catching up on my utilities while trying to figure out next month’s rent. Right now I’m writing, learning about affiliate marketing, painting small portraits of people and animals (which alone, means marketing, sales, design, and production), and it looks like I might be starting work soon in the graveyard shift of a call centre. All of this is so I can continue making the work that I believe has integrity and will stand some test of time. There is no set structure for me to easily fall into, and I believe this is essentially the case in all creative fields. There are regular patterns and relationships that can often form (artist-gallery, actor-agent-producer, writer-publication-publisher, etc.), but they can be highly unpredictable and inconsistent over time. There are two things that I believe are essential to making sure that risk-taking and failure are viable options for creative professionals: working unstoppably and building community. The only solution to workblock [...] is more work. - Jerry Saltz Work unstoppably Working unstoppably is important, because ceasing production is stagnation, and stagnating stinks. It keeps your mind fresh, and it's the best way to reaffirm your passion for what you are doing. It will be miserable, and it will have its ups and its downs, but it amounts to something if you work hard at working smart too. Build community Building community is crucial to working as an artist, because there is no way to do this alone. Talent can be honed in solitude, but hiding it away will never amount to being magically discovered. Surrounding yourself wherever possible and becoming a recognizable (and welcome) face is essential. Avoid making enemies, whenever possible. An English teacher once told me that you never know who you’re going to bump into down the road; that if you you ruin someone’s relationship or insult them greatly in your art school in Canada, you will inevitably bump into them as the assistant curator to one of your shows in Italy fifteen years later. Here is another quote I like about maintaining the community around you: Form groups. You must protect the runt. [...] Why? Because four of the other people think you’re the runt: they’re just never going to tell you. [...] Never break ranks. Guess who. It’s Jerry Saltz again. For those of you who don’t know him, he’s a respectable art critic based in New York. This is a great talk he gave about working through the rough as an artist, but it translates to any creative field. The thought I’d like to leave you with is this: I am struggling right now. It would be wrong to deny it, but I believe that my work is amounting to something. I may be tired and I might be stretching myself as thin as I can, but I feel like working through it is more important than even bothering to look up for a light at the end of the tunnel. So far as I am concerned the tunnel is endless, but it might have windows on the side some day. And I think I can convince some people to walk in it with me too.