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Man talking to a little girl sitting near him and a police officer carrying a little girl and standing next to a woman.
Uplifting News

Police Officer Saves 3-Month-Old - Five Years Later He’s Part of the Family

Being a new parent is terrifying because you’re always expecting the worst. But when the worst actually happens, and your baby stops breathing, you hope that a stranger like this police officer will be there to save the day.

Woman Helps Group of Motorcyclists Who Got Into an Accident - A Year Later, They Show Up at Her Daughters Lemonade Stand
Uplifting News

Woman Helps Group of Motorcyclists Who Got Into an Accident - A Year Later, They Show Up at Her Daughters Lemonade Stand

Bikers, with their leather jackets, roaring engines, and tough exteriors, often carry an image of rugged individualism. But underneath those helmets are hearts capable of remarkable kindness. This story is a testament to that fact.What One Nurse Saw While on a DriveThe tale begins with a terrible accident. Daryn Sturch, a dedicated nurse hailing from Indiana, was cruising down State Road 19 near Denver in September 2018. Little did she know that this ordinary drive would soon turn into an extraordinary moment of heroism.As she drove, she came across a harrowing sight: a severe accident involving multiple motorcyclists. Without hesitation, she sprang into action. Daryn, a nurse, understood the critical nature of the situation. Lives hung in the balance, and her skills were desperately needed.Daryn's daughter, witnessing her mother's unwavering commitment to helping others, recalled the moment:“I’m a nurse and saw several motorcycles were involved. I need to help.”With those words, Daryn rushed to the scene, unaware of the profound impact she was about to make.The accident was grave, and some of the bikers required immediate airlifting. Daryn's quick thinking and medical expertise played a pivotal role in ensuring that all of them survived. Her actions demonstrated the importance of swift assistance in road accidents, where seconds can make the difference between life and death.Why a Group of Motorcyclists Came to a Nurse’s HouseAfter the accident, fate took its course, and Daryn lost touch with the bikers she had helped that day. Yet, the memory of that fateful encounter lingered in her heart. She often found herself reflecting on the lives she had touched.Little did she know that the same motorcyclists, members of the Milwaukee Iron motorcycle group from Kokomo, Indiana, were equally eager to reunite with their guardian angel.Fast forward to the following year. Daryn's daughter decided to set up a lemonade stand, a quintessential childhood venture, on a warm day. As she cheerfully sold her refreshing drinks, an unmistakable rumble in the distance heralded a heartwarming reunion.A group of motorcyclists, the very same individuals from that life-altering accident, rumbled onto the scene. They had seen Daryn's post about the lemonade stand and saw it as the perfect opportunity to reconnect with the woman who had saved them.The scene that followed was a testament to the power of gratitude and human connection. Daryn's daughter greeted the bikers with waves, and they responded with enthusiasm. They parked their bikes and approached the lemonade stand, not just for a glass of lemonade but for a chance to express their profound gratitude.Why It’s Important to Not Judge People at First GlanceDaryn, overcome with emotion, took to Facebook to share this touching reunion. She expressed her pride in her daughter's initiative and her deep gratitude towards the bikers who had come to visit. Her post resonated with a message that transcended gratitude; it emphasized the importance of empathy and understanding.In her own words:“Thank you Milwaukee Iron for stopping at Bryanne’s lemonade stand and making her day. We love the T-shirts. #greatpeople.”Daryn's message serves as a poignant reminder that appearances can be deceiving. It's all too easy to judge people based on stereotypes, but beneath the surface, we're all capable of extraordinary acts of compassion. Daryn's courage and the bikers' gratitude teach us a profound lesson in empathy and humanity.In a world that sometimes feels divided, stories like this one bridge the gaps and remind us of the goodness that exists in people from all walks of life. So, the next time you encounter someone who doesn't fit your expectations, remember Daryn and the Milwaukee Iron bikers, and let kindness guide your actions.More from Goalcast:Man Lures 5-Year-Old With Ice-Cream and Kidnaps Her – But 2 Teens on Bikes Take Matters Into Their Own HandsWoman Buys 3-Year-Old a New Bike After She Finds Out His Was Stolen – Only Later Does Everyone Find Out Her Real StoryBullies Target 7-Year-Old in Horrific Hate Crime – Little Did They Know 20 Bikers Would Show Up at Their School

Postal Worker Notices Mail Piling Up at 80-Year-Olds House - Little Did She Know What She Was About to Walk Into
Uplifting News

Postal Worker Notices Mail Piling Up at 80-Year-Olds House - Little Did She Know What She Was About to Walk Into

Unless you’re home during the day, odds are you don’t pay that much attention to your mail carrier. But they sure as heck pay attention to you. In addition to knowing where you live and whether you’ve collected the mail, many postal workers will take note of whether your car has moved over the past few days or if packages are piling up. And, as this story proves, that can be a really good thing.The Mail Was Piling UpKayla Berridge was walking her normal nine-mile delivery route in a small New Hampshire town when she realized mail had been piling up for about four days at one resident’s home. It was odd to Berridge, as she and the 80-year-old woman who lived there would sometimes exchange pleasantries.“I hadn’t seen her in a while, and I noticed her mail wasn’t getting picked up, so I got a little concerned,” Berridge told CNN.“I just had a gut feeling and wanted to make sure,” she added to an ABC News affiliate. “Most people put a hold in if they're not there, so when people pick up their mail every day, you start to notice their habits.”Berridge followed her intuition and called the police to come and do a wellness check on the resident. Little did the postal worker know that she was about to save a life.The Woman Had Been Struggling for DaysInside the home, the Newmarket Police Department found the woman trapped on her bedroom floor under a bunch of artwork and frames. They estimated she had tried to grab her bed for support, but the items fell on her, trapping her for at least three days.She was suffering from hypothermia and dehydration when they found her, but otherwise, she was okay. And it was all thanks to Berridge taking note of the situation and following her gut.“We just think it's indicative of a small town and the mail carriers and the residents knowing each other and realizing something might not be right and reaching out to the proper authorities,” Newmarket police Lt. Wayne Stevens told the ABC affiliate.To CNN, he added that had Berridge not taken action; this woman would have had a much different outcome.“Without a doubt, she saved this lady’s life,” he said. “That’s part of being a letter carrier in a small town and taking your job to the next level. She did a great job.”Listening to Your IntuitionMost of us don’t go out of our way to find ourselves in a situation where another person needs our help, so it can be hard to know what to do when we are in a moment where our actions could have a major impact.Berridge had never been in this situation before, and she could have easily ignored her gut or waited another day to make the phone call to the police. But by trusting her instincts and doing what she thought was right, she saved a life.It’s a nice reminder that if you do find yourself in a similar situation where something doesn’t look right, you should act on it. Ask questions, don’t be afraid to step in, and if you really think it’s necessary, call someone for help.After all, as Berridge proved, it could be the difference between life and death. More from Goalcast:Woman’s Dog Saves Her Life by Sniffing Out 1-In-22 Million Kidney Donor During Trip to the Beach Fisherman Notices Jeep Sticking Out of the Water — What He Does Next Saves a Woman’s Life

Police Officer Pulls Over Speeding Mom and Her 10-Year-Old Son - Immediately Realizes Something Wasnt Right
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Police Officer Pulls Over Speeding Mom and Her 10-Year-Old Son - Immediately Realizes Something Wasnt Right

No one ever wants to be pulled over by the police. Stopping at the side of the road for speeding, running a red light, or some other infraction can be scary, not to mention costly if the officer decides to give you a ticket.For one mother in Rockwood, Michigan, however, getting pulled over by the police one day was absolutely terrifying for a whole other reason.A Dire SituationWhen Officer Nicholas Mitchell pulled over Rhonda McArthur for running a red light on a Monday morning, McArthur was petrified. Not because she would get a ticket or have to pay a hefty fine, but because her 10-year-old son, Nick, was in the backseat and he was in trouble.That morning, Nick had a serious asthma attack while he was getting ready for school. Unable to help her son, McArthur put him in the car and sped towards the hospital. When Mitchell pulled her over, Nick was almost out of breath.“He's telling me that he can't breathe. I'm like, 'Oh my god,' and so then I start panicking,” she recalled to Click on Detroit.“It felt like someone was holding my throat and choking me,” Nick explained to the publication. “I thought this was going to take forever.”Recognizing a Bad SituationOfficer Mitchell immediately realized something was wrong. “I could hear somebody in the car with very labored breathing; couldn't breathe at all,” he explained. So instead of asking McArthur for her registration and ID, he called for an ambulance. When one wasn’t available, he knew he had to save the child.With help from firefighters, who gave Nick an oxygen mask, Mitchell put the boy in the backseat of his cruiser.“Officer Mitchell just said, 'Let's go, get in the car,' and he drove us all the way to the hospital, lights, and sirens, as fast as he could,” McArthur recalled.They arrived at the hospital just in time, doctors later said, and Nick was saved. Now, Mitchell is being hailed as a hero.“It makes me feel good, and that's why I do this job, to help people,” he said.Putting People FirstMitchell may not see himself as a hero, but he absolutely became the McArthur family’s hero the day he pulled them over. Not because he was doing his job but because he was able to look at the situation and realize it wasn’t black and white.Yes, this mom broke the law by running that red light. But it was also a matter of life and death. By recognizing the situation and reacting quickly, Mitchell proved that sometimes, you have to have flexibility and forgo the rules in order to put people first.While we hope to never be in this kind of situation with a child’s life at stake, there are smaller ways to put that into practice with others. Not docking someone’s pay for being late, for example. Or perhaps it’s not giving them grief when they have to reschedule your appointment.The thing is, we don’t always know what someone else is going through, and they could have really great reasons for not showing up on time or having to reschedule with you. Unless you ask questions and show empathy and compassion, you’ll never know.We all deserve a little leeway in life, so why not start by giving it to others?More from Goalcast:Police Officer Pulls Struggling Father Over – Has The Best Response When He Hears His Touching StoryDistraught 79-Year-Old Is Pulled Over for Speeding – He Did Not Expect the Treatment He Received From the CopPolice Officer Passes by Struggling Homeless Woman on the Street – The Message on Her Shirt Makes Him Pull Over

Doctors Luggage and Equipment Were Seized at the Airport  So He Performs Surgeries in Flip Flops
Uplifting News

Doctors Luggage and Equipment Were Seized at the Airport So He Performs Surgeries in Flip Flops

The surgery Dr. Matt Oliva and his colleagues perform takes just four minutes and costs roughly $75 per patient. It also changes lives.According to the World Health Organization, more than 2 million Africans have lost their sight due to cataracts. A cataract is a clouding over of the eye’s natural lens, leading to blindness. As would be expected, when a person can’t see, their quality of life dramatically decreases —but even more so in a poverty-stricken country where options are extremely limited. They can’t work, and their family members must not only work to feed them but also keep them out of danger. Indeed, in Ethiopia, blind people are called “a mouth with no hands” because they have to be fed but can’t contribute to the household income.Cataract Surgery Changes LivesPhoto by MART PRODUCTIONThis is where Dr. Oliva and the Himalayan Cataract Project saw an amazing opportunity to do so much good for relatively little investment. Dr. Oliva has sat on the organization’s board for over a decade. He performs the simple, affordable cataract surgery in countries where residents would never get it otherwise, countries throughout Africa and Asia. On this particular trip, he joined fellow doctors from the United States and Canada at the Bisidimo Hospital in Ethiopia. Word had spread and the line at the hospital, a former leper colony, was long. Even though the procedure takes only minutes, some of the prospective patients would have to wait a day or two for surgery. They knew it. They had brought tents.A Doctor Without His ToolsDr. Oliva, on the other hand, arrived at the hospital without his bags. They had been seized by authorities at Ethiopian customs. The large amount of medical equipment he had brought with him from Oregon raised a red flag.But the doctor was undeterred. He would just have to improvise. Dr. Oliva donned a pair of flip flops, courtesy of the hotel he was staying at, and green scrubs from the hospital and got to work. In just six days, the team of doctors performed 1600 cataract surgeries. Many patients had just one cloudy eye, but others had two. The most complicated procedures — patients with deeply sunken eyes, for example — might take up to 20 minutes.A New Outlook on Life for Amina Ahmed60-year-old Amina Ahmed was the lucky recipient of one of those surgeries. She had heard about the campaign on the radio. Her extended family was struggling, her children working to feed and care for their mother and their own children at the same time.They worried about Ahmed when they couldn’t be around to watch her. Driven to exhaustion over the last four years of Ahmed’s worsening blindness, they hoped that the surgery be the miracle they had been praying for.And to their delight — especially Ahmed’s — it was. Cataracts develop for a variety of reasons, often with age, from injury or overexposure to sun or even vitamin deficiency. The lens of the eye becomes cloudy, causing the person to lose their vision. But the solution is shockingly simple. Doctors can remove the patient’s natural lens and replace it with a plastic one — a lens that will never become cloudy. And that lens only costs $4.That was exactly what Dr. Oliva’s team did for Amina Ahmed. And in the space of a few minutes, her world changed.“When I went to the hospital,” she said excitedly after the bandages were removed, “I couldn’t see and now I can see everything…I’m very happy. I can see the faces of everybody.” For Ahmed, “everybody” includes her children and extended family — but especially her two-year-old grandson. Before the surgery, she knew her grandson only by voice. “Now I can see his face,” she rejoiced.The Problem of AccessibilityIn Ethiopia, there are only 100 eye doctors. That’s about one eye doctor for every one million people. Dr. Mulu Lisanekwork, an ophthalmologist from Addis Ababa, says that all this untreated blindness contributes to poverty in Ethiopia. “People stop being productive when they get cataracts. And productive people are less productive because they have to take care of their blind family members.”Dr. Oliva knows firsthand the joy the simple surgery brings to his patients and how much it changes their lives. Eventually, the Ethiopian customs office did give the doctor his luggage back. But the minor setback hadn’t slowed him down. On a good day, Dr. Oliva and his team treated 400 cataracts.“It doesn’t really cost very much money,” said Dr. Oliva. The plastic lens itself costs $4, and even with overhead and personnel costs, a patient can have his or her sight restored for a mere $75. It truly is nothing short of a miracle.More from Goalcast:Mom Refuses to Terminate Her Pregnancy After Doctors Suggest It – Now Her Toddler Is Proving Everyone WrongDoctors Predicted He Wouldn’t Live Past the Age of 2 — 18 Years Later, His Heroic Nurse Gives Him This Snazzy PhotoshootPastor Donates Kidney to Stranger He Just Met – During the Surgery, Doctors Make a Shocking Discovery