• Pin

As a digital nomad and journalist, I travel the world while logging around 70 articles a month. To effectively manage a

As a digital nomad and journalist, I travel the world while logging around 70 articles a month. To effectively manage a country-hopping lifestyle while also building my bylines and clients, I turn to the advice of seasoned movers-and-shakers who have developed habits and strategies for success. Each week, I’ll highlight the daily routine of influential professionals, making for the right kind of fodder while you down your coffee.

While most people have a pretty targeted resume focusing on one killer skill they’ve honed over many courses and decades, Joe Rogan has, well, a laundry list of professional talents.

From being a stand-up comedian and a mixed martial arts color commentator to a podcast host, businessman and former television host and actor — he’s been impressing the masses since the late 80s. He’s been tied to Hardball and NewsRadio, the Ultimate Fighting Championship and of course, famously as the host for Fear Factor.

These days, he’s tapped into the audio fanfare with his popular podcast, The Joe Rogan Experience, the details career advice, funny stories and all sorts of motivation.

With an estimated net worth of more than $25 million, this father of three is an outspoken advocate on slightly controversial topics — including circumcision and hunting. All of these facts make his a well-known public figure and a big believer in his personal brand — which continues to grow leaps and bounds. Here, a few of his habits you need to know about.

He accepts discomfort.

Joe-Rogan-on-struggle

Here’s the thing: life is uncomfortable sometimes. Whether when you’re at the beginning stages of a fitness routine, at the end of a toxic relationship or navigating a new city with a dialect you don’t speak — part of being a functioning, healthy human is being at ease with the unknown.

For Rogan, discomfort isn’t a negative — but a positive. “Discomfort is your friend. Discomfort — not being happy and content with certain situations in life or certain feelings in life — are massive, massive motivators and they’re amazing at facilitating change,” he shared in his podcast.

In addition to mental parts of day-to-day life that aren’t always easy — negotiations or disagreements, to name a few — Rogan also puts his body into shock as a big believer in floating tanks. As he told Rolling Stone , “It can be brutal and unflinching in its portrayal of you and your reality,” and “It can be uncomfortable in the sense that you really can’t run away from any of the things that are subconsciously troubling you.”

He’s always prioritized his thoughts.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BrqT58cl2VU/

Your yoga teacher has said it so many times you’ve lost count: you are what you think. So much of how we perceive life and love, career and friendships, are in the way we think about them. Rogan believes this wholeheartedly, explaining to The Daily Wire on how he pushes for positivity, and is part of why he stopped fighting.

“I was realizing that fighting was really bad for your brain… This was going to definitely have a negative effect on my consciousness, there’s no way around it. The quality of my thoughts and the way I think about things is one of the most important things to guide me through life. I was putting my future brain in jeopardy.”

He doesn’t dwell on the past.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BmXS_HGHkDA/

In his podcast, Rogan once shared a simple, yet poignant truth: we are not who we were a year ago. Or five years ago. Even last week. Part of growing as a human and as a professional is understanding how far you’ve come, how much you’ve transformed and what you’ve made it through.

Those who dwell in the past often get stuck there, instead of working up the courage and the inspiration to move forward into the future that is waiting for them. No matter what you’re struggling with, if you ask Rogan, letting go is likely the answer.

He plans everything.

Joe-Rogan

Most successful entrepreneurs get up at the crack of dawn. And they live by very structured schedules that keep them on top of every last thing. This dedication to discipline is a principle that Rogan stands firm in, even sharing these tips in his podcasts over the years:

“The one thing discipline helps you with is it gets things done. When you actually do things, you have more success. A big part of success is not being lazy and just doing it. 90% of success is just showing up.”

“I’m the most lazy disciplined person I know.”

“Write it down. Write down everything that you want to do. Write down what you would like to fix about your life.”

“I schedule my workouts every Sunday. I schedule everything that I’m going to do during the week.”

He learns from his critics.

Joe-Rogan-on-success

Twitter might seem like an unlikely source for self-improvement, but for Rogan, listening to someone who is 90 percent hater and 10 percent on point has been helpful. In fact, this type of (somewhat) constructive criticism is a soft skill nearly every accomplished leader must figure out.

“It’s a terrible feeling when someone is hating on you but I find it beneficial because 1. It’s like snake venom because if you get bit by a rattlesnake and you’ve never been bit by a rattlesnake before, it will fuck you up,” he shared on The Alex Jones Show.

“Someone who has never been famous and then decides to do a reality show and they get all these insults hurled at them online, that’s gotta be horrific and torturous. When you take a little bit of hate venom, you develop an immunity to it and you kind of understand what it is. Well, then it becomes a check-in mechanism. I look at it almost like it’s an algorithm. I look at it like, this negative coming in, how much does it affect me? And how much does it affect the positivity that I put out?”

For more Daily Habits: